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Presenter Information
Workshop Series

Friday May 31, 2019         9:00 am – 11:00 am         Opus Ballroom

CHHA TALKS: Our Stories, Our Journeys, Our Future……

This presentation features professional speakers devoted to spreading revolutionary ideas. This expert panel will share their exciting and cutting-edge experiences in their own hearing loss journey. This session will be dedicated to spreading innovative ideas and motivating discoveries for all to enjoy.

Featured Speakers: Gael Hannan, Kristopher Martin, Ruth Warick, Jérémie Voix, Nick Laperle.

Gael Hannan
Gael Hannan
Gael Hannan is a humorist, public speaker and writer on hearing loss issues. In her 25 years of advocacy, Gael has created award-winning performance works and educational programs that explain the life with hearing loss and the tools for kicking down its barriers. She is a regular contributor to HearingHealthMatters.org, Canadian Audiologist journal, and other publications. Gael’s acclaimed book, The Way I Hear It, has received international acclaim from people with hearing loss and the professionals that serve them.

 
 
 
Kristopher Martin
Kris MartinKristopher Martin is a 32-year-old motivational speaker, professional race car driver and social media influencer from Burlington, Ontario. He grew up with different challenges that made him the strong young man he has become today. Ask Kris Martin to do something for you and his standard response is “Not a problem.” Stepping in a race car that reaches speeds of over 200 miles per hour. Not a problem. Speaking to over 300 hundred students who look at him as a role model. Not a problem. Being born profoundly deaf. Not a problem. In fact, being born hearing impaired may have helped Kris. He learned to race by primarily using his tactile senses and has given him a great ability to feel the track and use his instincts. Today Kris is actually able to receive partial hearing through the use of a implant he had surgically implanted when he was 7 year old. The company named Phonak Hearing Systems created an audio device that uses radio frequency which allows Kris to communicate with his spotters. He certainly has the talent to race and he comes with racing in his blood. Warren Coniam (Uncle) and Doug Syer (Grandfather) are both in the Canadian Racing Hall of Fame. Kris also is strong proponent of giving back to those who are alike himself. A role model for many, Kris speaks to children, adults and charities across North America. His speeches give hope to not only children, but to parents that their children can defy any odds that may be placed against them. Kris has the natural gift of inspiring a variety of audiences no matter the age by showing them there are no limits to what one can accomplish. Ask Kris if he is ready. He will tell you…not a problem.
 
Dr. Ruth Warick
Ruth WarickDr. Ruth Warick is a founding member of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association and a former National President. She is President of the CHHA Vancouver Branch and serves as a board member for the BC Chapter of CHHA. She has been active in developing an On-Line Mentoring Program for hard of hearing persons and the annual Walk2Hear program held every September in Vancouver to raise awareness about hearing loss. She is President of the International Federation of Hard of Hearing Persons, a position held since 2010. She launched IFHOH’s human rights program and an Inclusive Education development project in Uganda and Nepal. She liaises closely with the World Health Organization and is on the Foundation Committee for its World Hearing Forum. Ruth is first Vice-President of the International Disability Alliance and a past president of the Western Institute for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing as well as the BC Family Hearing Resource Centre. She is the Senior Accessibility Advisor at the University of British Columbia. She completed her PhD at UBC in 2003; her dissertation was on Voices Unheard: The Academic and Social Experiences of University Students who are Hard of Hearing.
 
Prof. Jérémie Voix, P.Eng., Ph.D.
Chairholder of the NSERC-EERS Industrial Research Chair in In-Ear Technologies (CRITIAS)

Jérémie VoixProfessor Jérémie Voix is an acoustics specialist with over 20 years of experience in workplace noise mitigation. Since 2000, he has worked concurrently in academic and industrial settings, published his fundamental and applied research results, and continued to register patents for an advanced individual hearing protection solution. Professor Voix has authored or co-authored over 120 scientific publications as well as a dozen patents. As a hearing protection expert, he is regularly invited to contribute to the organization of international conferences and to review articles and thesis. He has been awarded several prizes and distinctions in recent years, including the 2019 Early Career Award awarded by International Commission for Acoustics (ICA), the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec “Hommage reconnaissance pour contribution exceptionnelle” (2017) and the ÉTS Board of Director’s “Prix d’excellence en recherche– Chercheur émergent” (2017). He was appointed Research and Innovation Ambassador by the ÉTS Alumni Association and received TechnoMontréal’s Inspiration|Innovation award (2012). Professor Voix is President of the Canadian Acoustical Association (CAA), and Associate Director (Scientific and Technological Research) at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology (CIRMMT), housed at McGill University’s Schulich School of Music, where he is also an Adjunct Professor. He is as well an associate member of the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS) and co-founder of the ÉTS-IRSST joint infrastructure laboratory for acoustic research (ICAR–Infrastructure commune en acoustique pour la recherche). Member of the Canadian Standards Association Z94.2 committee on Hearing Protection (CSA S304.3-SC), he is an active member of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) S12 WG11 working group. He was in charge of writing the technical content of ANSI S12.71-2018 standard, which now governs field attenuation measurement systems for hearing protectors.

Nick Laperle, LLB
Founder, CEO of EERS Global Technologies (EERS) & Chief Hearing Evangelist

Nick LaperleAs President and CEO of EERS Global Technologies Inc., Mr. Laperle oversees business development and public relations. For the last 10 years, he has worked closely with ETS University by establishing the innovative NSERC-EERS Industrial Research Chair in In-Ear Technologies (CRITIAS), whose focus is on successful commercialization of university research. Graduate from Law from the Université de Sherbrooke, he has more than 20 years of experience in hearing-related matters, following in the steps of his parents who, over a 40-year period, pioneered hearing health clinics across Quebec. From 1999 to 2009, he was the President and CEO of Sonomax Technologies Inc., a leader in sound isolating and enhancing technologies. Mr. Laperle currently sits on the NIOSH National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Council for the adoption and promotion of working solutions for the prevention of hearing loss in the workplace.
 

Workshop Series Number 1
Friday May 31, 2019         1:00 pm to 2:15 pm         Breakout Rooms

Workshop 1: Tinnitus: What It Is and What It Is Not. Exposing Common Misconceptions about Tinnitus
Presented By: Dr. Cindy Potechin, PhD
Concerto Room

Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the ears when no noise external to the body is present. In the absence of a specific and reliable cure for chronic tinnitus, people who are extremely bothered by their tinnitus symptoms have been known to go to extreme lengths to treat the condition. Certain common myths exist that can delay tinnitus treatment or cause unnecessary hardship for individuals who experience bothersome tinnitus. The focus of this session is to compare information about common myths and misconceptions about tinnitus and to provide factual information about the condition and its treatments. Through an examination of individual myths about tinnitus, information about hearing loss and tinnitus will be provided to the participants along with information about the scientifically supported treatments for tinnitus.

Dr. Cindy Potechin
Cindy PotechinDr. Cindy Potechin obtained her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Concordia University. She has been helping people cope with their tinnitus symptoms and/or hearing related difficulties at MAB-Mackay since 2012. Based on her experience assisting people diagnosed with chronic tinnitus, the annoyance of tinnitus symptoms can be often be reduced with the use of different techniques. At the 2019 CHHA conference, she will be speaking about myths related to tinnitus that have led have often led to an increase in distress of tinnitus sufferers or to a delay in their seeking effective strategies to cope with their tinnitus.

 

 

Workshop 2: Putting Self Care First When You Have a Hearing Loss
Presented By: Martha Perusse, MSc(A), PPCP
Vivaldi Room

As anyone who leads a stressful life can attest, self-care is essential in navigating the joys and realities of everyday living. Having a hearing loss can add an extra layer of stress. In this session, we will explore together how self-care can include such actions as developing more communication strategies, becoming a better advocate for our needs and determining the daily routines that promote feelings of control and calm. How can you make self-care a bigger part of your life? During this session, participants will share about the challenges that hearing loss can present in our lives. The speaker will talk about her hearing journey and encourage others to share theirs. The checklist tool developed by the presenter will be used to discuss strategies for becoming more knowledgeable, learning about technology, advocacy for self and others, improving quality of life and prioritizing self-care. If desired by the group, some demonstration coaching could be included.

Martha Perusse
Martha PerusseMartha Perusse serves as President of the Board at CHIP (Communicaid for Hearing Impaired Persons) in Montreal, QC. Her lifelong interest in issues related to hearing inspired her to obtain a MSc(A) in Auditory Oral Education and Rehabilitation from McGill University. Martha dedicated her 36-year career at the Montreal Oral School for the Deaf (MOSD) to improving the lives of children with hearing loss and their families. After working as a specialist teacher/therapist, she moved into administration at MOSD prior to retiring in 2014, the year she received the Distinguished Alumni Award for Professional Leadership from McGill University. With a passion for helping individuals to become all that they can be, Martha is also a professional and personal coach. She has a moderate to severe hearing loss and wears hearing aids. Living in Montreal, she devotes her time to caring for her aging parents, enjoying her family (including her little grandson), coaching and volunteering, especially in the field of hearing.

Workshop 3: Inspire Democracy: Accessible Voting and Getting Involved in the 2019 Federal Election
Elections Canada
Beethoven Room
Presented By: Juan Melara-Pineda and Cyntia Henley

In the 2015 federal election, most voters were unaware of the tools and services that Elections Canada offers to make voting more accessible. As the 2019 federal election approaches, the goal is to ensure that Canadians with hearing loss know what services are available to make voting more accessible. Elections Canada will share information about registration and voting and explore other ways to get involved in the election, whether it is by working as an election official or running as a candidate.
There are two components to this presentation: Accessible Voting and Inspiring Democracy.

Juan Melara-Pineda
Juan Melara-PinedaJuan Melara-Pineda holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Ottawa and has worked in electoral administration since 2013. His thesis focused on political participation of ethnic minorities. As part of his outreach and consultation work with Elections Canada, Juan seeks to build partnerships with community organizations interested civic engagement and accessibility, in view of promoting an accessible and inclusive electoral framework that Canadians trust and use.

 

 

Cyntia Henley
Cynthia HenleyCyntia Henley graduated from the University of Québec at Outaouais in Communications and Professional Writing. She worked to empower French minority communities in the not-for-profit sector before starting at Elections Canada in 2015, right in the middle of the election readiness period. This experience gave her a new perspective to the electoral process, one that deepened her interest in the democratic system. This led her to pursue a role on the Outreach team to raise awareness about voting and to make the voting process more accessible.

 

 

Workshop 4: How YouTube Equips the Hard of Hearing to Share Their Messages Through Video/CC
Presented By: Dan Willis
Tchaikovsky Room

This presentation will demonstrate how YouTube equips the hard of hearing with the tools necessary in order to communicate their passions, visions and businesses to the world through the use of video/closed caption. This workshop will demonstrate the opportunity provided by Youtube Demonstrating the simplicity of creating promotional content demonstrating the value of communicating through video in the emerging digital landscape.

Dan Willis
Dan WillisWith a passion for the value, community brings to a brand Dan consults with companies in how to best use digital content and advertising to build an authentic and genuine personality that a community can relate to. Having helped craft campaigns for H&M, Toyota, FOX TV, and many more Dan has a unique and in-depth experience to back the strategies he implements. One of Databird Research Journals “Top 100 Keynote Speakers to Watch in 2019” Dan is excited about bringing the message of relational marketing to stages, conferences and events internationally and helping businesses take back their personalities

 

 

Workshop Series Number 2
Friday May 31, 2019         3:00 pm to 4:15 pm         Breakout Rooms

Workshop 1: Brain, the Final Frontier: To Boldly Go Beyond the Cochlea
Presented By: Jo(anne) DeLuzio
Concerto Room

What is the journey of sound beyond the cochlea and how do we process speech? This presentation will describe, in a down-to-earth way, the hearing pathways to the brain and the brain structures associated with spoken language. Changes to the brain when someone has hearing loss will be discussed as well as research on whether there is a relationship between hearing loss and cognitive decline. Basic knowledge of the outer, middle and inner ear is assumed and will not be reviewed.

Jo Deluzio
Jo Deluzio
Jo(anne) DeLuzio has practiced as an audiologist for almost 36 years in both the private and public sectors. In addition to her audiology degrees from Western University, Jo holds a PhD from the university of Toronto in Speech-language pathology where she has been teaching for 20 years. During her career she has had the privilege of working with thousands of people who are d/Deaf, deafened, and hard of hearing. She has learned to actively listen (Tougher than it seems. Audiologists are better talkers than they are listeners.) and learn from the stories of people’s journeys of living with hearing loss. She has concluded that hearing health care professionals need to stop thinking that their role is to assess and treat hearing and related disorders. Instead, they need to work in partnership with people to provide information and services that empower them to make their own choices of how they want to navigate their world. Difficulty in communicating cannot be measured by an audiogram, and severity of “deafness” cannot predict ability to participate in one’s own life networks. Jo’s work has always been about access to service, whatever that might mean to people. Jo believes that her greatest accomplishment (after surviving parenting 6 teenagers!) is when former students go on to advocate for services and removal of barriers for people who are d/Deaf, deafened, or hard of hearing.

Workshop 2: Healthy Living for Kids and Young Adults Who Live with Hearing Loss
Presented By: Jade Coultman
Vivaldi Room

Facilitated discussion will engage participants in identifying barriers to full participation in community life & demonstrating effective application of resources and strategies in examples of successful accessibility initiatives. Participants will learn accepted principles for effective communication & advocacy and develop strategies to build connections and achieve improved accessibility in their communities, taking away at least one action they can implement immediately.

Jade Coultman
Jade CoultmanFounder of Jade’s Camp for Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Diagnosis at the age of 2 with bilateral hearing loss in the severe to profound frequency. Jade grew up in Calgary and attended mainstreamed schooling. Living with hearing loss Jade understands the challenges and recognize the opportunities to provide services for kids who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. She never had the chance growing up to attend camp herself, Jade wanted to give back and create a place for kids by providing accessible communication, inclusion and universal design environment. Camp is a place for connections, friendship, self-awareness, building confidence, learning advocacy skills and most of all have Fun! Jade is an entrepreneur at heart. When she is planning and organizing camp, she enjoys being a trusted real estate advisor. Along with helping people buy, sell, and invest in real estate, she provides rental services for owners who are renting their places out. In her down time, founded and co-chairs Accessibility Advisory committee at St. Mary’s University and a director for CHHA Young Adults Network. Jade enjoys spending time with family and friends, reading, teaching herself new recipes for baking and cooking.

Workshop 3: Finding our HOHselves
Presented By: Bowen Tang, Hart Plommer and Jennifer Brown
Tchaikovsky Room

Do you view your hearing as a part of you or a burden to be rid of? Ever wonder if someone in your workplace or neighborhood is hard of hearing? There are many of us out there and yet we hide in plain sight. Join us for a discussion to highlight the challenges of connecting with other HOH people due to different perspectives on identities and learn what is being done to build a vibrant hard of hearing community. People often have difficulty identifying with the term “hard of hearing” as it is open to different interpretations based on a person’s experience. In this session, we will spend time exploring the spectrum in this identity. Members of the audience will share their experiences with their HOH identity. We will identify factors contributing to the challenges faced by HOHs connecting with others in their communities. We will highlight examples of existing programs and services within CHHA network.

Bowen Tang
Bowen Tang
Bowen Tang, M.E.D., CAEDHH certified, is a teacher for the deaf and hard of hearing from Vancouver, Canada. He has profound hearing loss and uses a cochlear implant. In 2012, he co-founded a peer support program within CHHA-BC which aims to support deaf and hard of hearing youth in their navigation of social relationships in secondary and post-secondary institutions. He is also the President of the International Federation of Hard of Hearing Young People.

Hart Plommer
Hart PlommerHart Plommer is a PhD. candidate in Chemistry (Memorial University) and currently resides in his hometown of Kamloops, BC. He has served on the Young Adults Network board since 2016, first as treasurer and since 2017, as vice-president. He has been active with CHHA-NL helping to facilitate the Young Adults Resource Group as well as mentoring teenagers with hearing loss in the Leadership, Empowerment & Achievement Program.

Jennifer Brown
Jennifer BrownJennifer Brown is a Computing Engineering Student at the College of the North Atlantic in St. John’s, Newfoundland. She was born with severe to profound hearing loss with EVA (Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts). She has been actively involved with the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association, Newfoundland and Labrador chapter since a young age. Jennifer is currently serving on the CHHA-NL board as a director and Young Adult Representative.

 

 

Workshop 4: Promoting an Inclusive Workforce in the 2019 Federal Election
Elections Canada
Beethoven Room
Presented By: Juan Melara-Pineda and Cyntia Henley

Thinking of working at the next federal election, but not sure if it’s right for you? Take part in Elections Canada’s workshop to learn about how you can play an important role in the democratic process by working in the next federal election. This session will provide an overview of the job opportunities available through an election, how to apply and how you can make a difference in your community’s voting experience. Elections Canada wants to make sure that all polling stations are diverse, just like Canada’s communities, so we are looking to hire:
• persons with disabilities
• people who speak a language other than the common official language in their riding
• First Nations people, Métis or Inuit
• youth
• students

Juan Melara-Pineda
Juan Melara-PinedaJuan Melara-Pineda holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Ottawa and has worked in electoral administration since 2013. His thesis focused on political participation of ethnic minorities. As part of his outreach and consultation work with Elections Canada, Juan seeks to build partnerships with community organizations interested civic engagement and accessibility, in view of promoting an accessible and inclusive electoral framework that Canadians trust and use.

 

 

Cyntia Henley
Cynthia HenleyCyntia Henley graduated from the University of Québec at Outaouais in Communications and Professional Writing. She worked to empower French minority communities in the not-for-profit sector before starting at Elections Canada in 2015, right in the middle of the election readiness period. This experience gave her a new perspective to the electoral process, one that deepened her interest in the democratic system. This led her to pursue a role on the Outreach team to raise awareness about voting and to make the voting process more accessible.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special Product Demonstration
Saturday June 1, 2019         8:00 am to 9:00 am

Cochlear Product Demo
Nucleus and Baha True WirelessTM Accessories, Nucleus Smart App and Baha 5 Smart

Presented By: Ariane Gobeil, Dorota Simpson
Tchaikovsky Room

The purpose of this demo is to provide an overview of our Nucleus and Baha True WirelessTM and Smart App technologies. Attendees will learn the fundamentals of our True Wireless accessories, how it could help them in everyday life and how to pair them with both Nucleus and Baha processors. We will also review the Nucleus 7 Smart AppTM and Baha 5 Smart AppTM for both iPhone and Android products, including new exciting features such as ‘Find my Processor’. Additional tools and resources will be provided to each participant.

Ariane Gobeil

Clinical Territory Manager for Cochlear Americas

Ariane GobeilAriane is the territory manager serving the East Canada Region. In this role, she provides training and education as well as clinical and surgical support related to cochlear implant and Baha recipients in her territory. Ariane earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Audiology at the University of Montréal in 2007. Prior to joining Cochlear in February of 2016, Ariane worked as a clinical cochlear implant and Baha audiologist at the MAB-Mackay rehabilitation Centre in Montreal. She has been a Cochlear Implant programming audiologist since 2009.
 
Dorota Simpson
Engagement Manager for Canada

Dorota SimpsonDorota joined Cochlear in September 2017. Her personal hearing journey began in 2009 when her son, Lukas, was diagnosed with a progressive hearing loss. His story began with bilateral hearing aids and in 2012 he underwent bilateral cochlear implantation. Since 2011 she has been an active volunteer and advocate supporting many families throughout their hearing loss experience. This led to her new role where she continues to support candidates, recipients and volunteers through their hearing journey.
 
 

 
 

Workshop Series Number 3
Saturday June 1, 2019         9:00 am to 10:15 am         Breakout Rooms

Workshop 1: Meaningful Accessibility in the Built Environment
Presented by Sarah McCarthy & Kevin Ng
Concerto Room

Today, 1/7 Canadian adults identify as having a mobility, vision or hearing disability. This number is expected to increase to 1/5 by 2036. 57% of people with disabilities who do not work believe they could if barriers were removed, allowing more than half a million people to find meaningful employment and contribute millions of dollars to our GDP. The Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility Certification program (RHFAC) was designed to create meaningful access in the built environment.

Sarah McCarthy
Sarah McCarthySarah McCarthy is the Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at the Rick Hansen Foundation, where she is responsible for leading the Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility Certification™ (RHFAC) program. She brings national and international experience to this role, previously working for an association management consulting firm where she served as Executive Director of several non-profit professional healthcare organizations. Sarah has an MSc in pharmacology and therapeutics and an MBA in strategic management from the University of British Columbia.

 
 

Kevin Ng
Kevin NgKevin Ng is the Certification Adjudicator for the Rick Hansen Foundation Accessibility Certification™ (RHFAC) program. He has extensive knowledge of local and international accessible design standards and universal design principles, having worked as an accessibility consultant in both private and non-profit organizations. He also had the opportunity to work with people with disabilities and advocacy groups in Taiwan to improve accessibility in the country. Kevin has a Bachelor in Urban Planning from Ryerson University.
 
 

 
 
Workshop 2: Toward Accessible Communities: How You Can Make a Difference
Presented By: Anne Griffin, Janine Verge, Dana Song
Vivaldi Room

Facilitated discussion will engage participants in identifying barriers to full participation in community life & demonstrating effective application of resources and strategies in examples of successful accessibility initiatives. Participants will learn accepted principles for effective communication & advocacy and develop strategies to build connections and achieve improved accessibility in their communities, taking away at least one action they can implement immediately.This interactive session will identify barriers to full participation in community life and provide examples of successful initiatives to improve accessibility and available resources and opportunities. Participants will learn accepted principles for effective communication and develop skills and strategies for advocacy and awareness, which they can use immediately to build connections and improve accessibility in their communities.

Anne Griffin
Anne GriffinAnne Griffin, M.Sc Aud 1989, (UBC), is a licensed clinical audiologist and research associate with Dr. Terry Lynn Young’s genetic research team at Memorial University of Newfoundland. For the past 29 years, she has lived and worked in Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador, providing diagnostic and rehabilitation services for hearing loss through public and private healthcare. Extensive clinical experience has convinced her that people with hearing loss are best served when empowered with information and resources to manage its impact throughout their lives. Anne is currently the Coordinator of Research for the Genomic Based Research and Development Centre for Health in Grand Falls-Windsor, a community facility established through a partnership of the town with Memorial University. This centre conducts research and education on hearing loss and has just formed a partnership with NL Balance and Dizziness to provide research support and clinical services on site. Anne is an active member of the Canadian Academy of Audiology, the International Society of Audiology, a lifetime member and volunteer with CHHA, and the recipient of several CHHA awards for service and advocacy.

Janine Verge
Janine VergeJanine Verge has worked clinically as an Audiologist for over 20 years. She obtained her MSc in Audiology from Dalhousie University and her AuD from AT Still University. She is an adjunct professor at the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and a lecturer for the School of Physiotherapy and the Division of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery at Dalhousie University. She has served as president of the Speech and Hearing Association of Nova Scotia and is currently serving her second term as a board member of the Canadian Academy of Audiology. As someone with single sided deafness, accessibility issues have always been of great interest to her. She is a co-founder and continuing committee member of the Dalhousie Hearing Aid Assistance Program, which provides donated hearing aids to low income seniors. She is also president and co-owner of ‘Accessible Hearing Solutions’ a consulting business specializing in hearing loop and DM system installations.

Dana Song, RAud, Aud(C), Clinical Audiologist
Dana SongDana Song recently obtained her MSc in Audiology from Dalhousie University in 2018 and has been working as a clinical audiologist in Western Newfoundland. Having worn bilateral hearing aids since infancy, accessibility issues and promoting advocacy for others with hearing loss has been a growing interest of hers. She hopes to work with pediatric populations in the future.

 
 

 

Workshop 3: A Love Story About Hearing
Presented By: Caroline and Andreas Schwabe
Beethoven Room

Hearing loss is still stigmatized. Caroline has a cochlear implant. Andreas is a human microphone. What happens when a DHH server and a media producer with exceptional ears decide they should get married? It’s a long story, with a happy ending. It’s not just our story, it’s everyone’s story. With 30 years of experience, Andreas & Caroline communicate the hearing loss journey with an unflinching look at how hearing loss affects relationships, and health. In Part One we trace the experiences and strategies as Caroline’s hearing eroded from mild to profound & provide insight into how to avoid our mistakes. Part Two examines how the dimensions of sound: time, frequency, amplitude. Demonstrations and listening exercises include everyone in an understanding how sound is put together, and strategies to hear better in public. Part Three brings parts 1 and 2 together to explore hearing loss from the perspective of hearing health in daily living.

Caroline and Andreas Schwabe
Caroline & Andreas SchwabeCaroline and Andreas met one day and were engaged the next. They’ve always been on the same page. The way Caroline and Andreas think about it, “we are hearing impaired.” Caroline was born with hearing. A little-understood form of congenital hearing loss. Everyone in her family has the same hearing for hearing loss. At 21, Caroline got her first pair of hearing aids. Every few years, new, more powerful aids were needed. Caroline and Andreas adapted to the changes in Caroline’s hearing until by 2015 it was clear hearing aids were going to provide loud mumbling. Andreas has exceptional hearing, and is a writer, media producer, musician, and broadcaster; a man who loves sound. Andreas had a better technical understanding of Caroline’s hearing loss, but that allowed the couple to think about sound and provide sound to Caroline in new ways. In October 2017, Caroline became a candidate for a Cochlear implant. Caroline’s activation was January 29, 2018. The shock of virtually spontaneous and complete access to a missing sense sparked a flurry of listening exercises and focus on nothing but sound. Now Caroline and Andreas say, “We have a Cochlear implant.” Andreas is Director of Media Services at Graphos Canada. Caroline is an award-winning professional server and hospitality consultant. The Couple shares their experiences through a podcast and blog at mybeautifulcyborg.

Workshop 4: HEAR/ENTENDRE
Presented By: Abby Stonehouse & Heidy Wager
Tchaikovsky Room

CHIP’s Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) prevention program is designed to teach children aged 8-12 about sound, the dangers of loud noise, the structures of the ear, and how to prevent NIHL. Learn how Quebec’s first NIHL prevention program came to fruition. This program is the only recreational prevention program in Canada. The pilot project ran in the summer of 2018 and reached almost 500 kids. Learn about how it got started, got funding and why we chose to take a recreational, harm-reduction approach. A pivotal part of the success of this program is that it is delivered by someone living with hearing loss, like the presenter, Abby Stonehouse. Abby is a recent Concordia University graduate. She has a BA in Psychology with a specialization in developmental psychology. Abby has moderate hearing loss and has been wearing hearing aids since 2015. Abby has been the Program Coordinator for CHIP/CAPA since July 2018 and was instrumental in developing this prevention program for CHIP. She will also be joined by Heidy Wager, Executive director at CHIP. Abby and Heidy will be presenting the NIHL prevention program in hopes of joining forces with other organizations like CHIP to help reduce the risk of NIHL among youth.

Abby Stonehouse
Abby StonehouseAbby Stonehouse is a recent Concordia University graduate. She has a BA in Psychology with a specialization in developmental psychology. Abby has moderate hearing loss and has been wearing hearing aids since 2015. Abby has been the Program Coordinator for CHIP/CAPA since July 2018 and was instrumental in developing the HEAR-ENTENDRE program for CHIP. The HEAR-ENTENDRE program is Quebec’s first Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) prevention program. This recreational program is designed to teach children aged 8-12 about sound, the dangers of loud noise, the structures of the ear, and how to prevent NIHL. Abby will be presenting the HEAR-ENTENDRE program in hopes of joining forces with other organizations like CHIP to help reduce the risk of NIHL among youth.
 
Heidy Wager
Heidy WagerHeidy Wager, has a BA in Human Relations as well as Special Care Counselling and Business Management degrees. She is an experienced Executive Director with almost 30 years history, working in the not-for-profit organizational management field. With a demonstrated track record in community engagement, she is a faithful advocate, dedicated to program development. She is a compassionate leader who fosters teamwork and is zealous about capacity building. Heidy is an extremely passionate humanitarian who joined the CHIP leadership team over 5 years ago and has been dedicated to the success of CHIP’S mission ever since.
 
 
 
 
Workshop Series Number 4
Saturday June 1, 2019         10:45 am to 12:00 pm         Breakout Rooms
 

Workshop 1: Engaging the Hearing Loss Community in Patient-Oriented Research
Presented by: Dr. April Pike, Anne Griffin, Joanne Smith-Young, Myrtle Barrett
Concerto Room

Patient-Oriented Research (POR) is a Canadian initiative for health research informed by full and active involvement of key stakeholders in all aspects of the research project. In POR patients are considered the experts. The aims of this workshop are to introduce participants to POR by using an example of a project currently underway in NL with seniors (aged 50+) affected by hearing loss (HL). Criteria regarding the development of a national strategy for the HL community will be explored.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the process of developing a Patient-Oriented Research (POR) Project. An example of a POR project currently underway in NL with seniors (aged 50+) affected by hearing loss (HL) will be presented that will highlight some of the challenges faced by this community. The audience will be invited to participate in a brainstorming session to provide input into criteria regarding the development of a national strategy to support the HL community.

Dr. April Pike
April PikeDr. April Pike is an Associate Professor at Memorial University Faculty of Nursing, St. John’s, Newfoundland (NL). She holds an Undergraduate and Master’s degree in Nursing and a PhD in Medicine: Community Health and Humanities. Her research expertise is in the field of genetics, cardiovascular disease, and qualitative research methods

 
 
 
 
Joanne Smith-Young
Joanne Smith-YoungJoanne Smith-Young is a Research Coordinator at Memorial University Faculty of Nursing, St. John’s, Newfoundland (NL). She holds an Undergraduate and Master’s degree in Nursing and is completing her PhD in Medicine: Clinical Epidemiology. Her research expertise is in the field of autism, chronic disease management, and qualitative research methods.

 
 
Anne Griffin
Anne GriffinAnne Griffin, M.Sc Aud 1989, (UBC), is a licensed clinical audiologist and research associate with Dr. Terry Lynn Young’s genetic research team at Memorial University of Newfoundland. For the past 29 years, she has lived and worked in Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador, providing diagnostic and rehabilitation services for hearing loss through public and private healthcare. Extensive clinical experience has convinced her that people with hearing loss are best served when empowered with information and resources to manage its impact throughout their lives. Anne is currently the Coordinator of Research for the Genomic Based Research and Development Centre for Health in Grand Falls-Windsor, a community facility established through a partnership of the town with Memorial University. This centre conducts research and education on hearing loss and has just formed a partnership with NL Balance and Dizziness to provide research support and clinical services on site. Anne is an active member of the Canadian Academy of Audiology, the International Society of Audiology, a lifetime member and volunteer with CHHA, and the recipient of several CHHA awards for service and advocacy.

Myrtle Barrett
Myrtle BarrettMyrtle Barrett has a progressive, profound hearing loss and has been a cochlear implant user for the past four years. She is a retired social worker who was recognized by her peers with a national award. Myrtle is also an internationally respected advocate for people with hearing loss. Myrtle has been with the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association since its beginning over 30 years ago. She has been active at all levels of the organization – locally, provincially, she is a past President of the CHHA National Board of Directors and CHHA Newfoundland & Labrador. In addition to the many access committees on which she has served, one of her major passions is working with youth and young adults with hearing loss and has spearheaded many initiatives aimed at helping them become strong self-advocates and future leaders in their communities.

 

Workshop 2: On-Line Mentoring for Hard of Hearing Persons
Presented By Dr. Ruth Warick
Vivaldi Room

Often persons who are newly affected by a hearing loss have questions about what it is like to live with a hearing loss, what to do in potentially awkward or embarrassing situations, how to deal with disclosure and situations of a lack of hearing. To reach such persons, CHHA BC and Vancouver developed a one-on-one on-line peer mentoring program. This session will describe the project, its development, training and resource materials, current status, evaluation results and future directions.

In this session we will discuss the development of the project including establishing a website platform for the program, content development for the website and training programs, recruitment and selection of mentors, the development of resources, and the evaluation process. Tools such as the Code of Conduct for both mentors and mentees is an example of a resource developed through the project. Evaluations processes and lessons learned including how to best advertise the program will be shared.

Dr. Ruth Warick
Ruth WarickDr. Ruth Warick is a founding member of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association and a former National President. She is President of the CHHA Vancouver Branch and serves as a board member for the BC Chapter of CHHA. She has been active in developing an On-Line Mentoring Program for hard of hearing persons and the annual Walk2Hear program held every September in Vancouver to raise awareness about hearing loss. She is President of the International Federation of Hard of Hearing Persons, a position held since 2010. She launched IFHOH’s human rights program and an Inclusive Education development project in Uganda and Nepal. She liaises closely with the World Health Organization and is on the Foundation Committee for its World Hearing Forum. Ruth is first Vice-President of the International Disability Alliance and a past president of the Western Institute for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing as well as the BC Family Hearing Resource Centre. She is the Senior Accessibility Advisor at the University of British Columbia. She completed her PhD at UBC in 2003; her dissertation was on Voices Unheard: The Academic and Social Experiences of University Students who are Hard of Hearing.

Workshop 3: A Toolkit for Navigating the First Year of Post-secondary Education with a Hearing Loss
Presented By: Pam Millett, PhD
Beethoven Room

The first year of college or university is always stressful, but having a hearing loss can add extra considerations, planning, and uncertainties. This workshop will address strategies for researching programs, preparing for September, organizing support from the accessibility office, managing classes and coursework, maximizing technology (assistive devices, apps, etc.) and working with professors.

Pam Millett, PhD
Pam MillettPam Millett, PhD, Reg. CASLPO is an Associate Professor and Academic Coordinator in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education Program at York University. She has been an educational audiologist in school boards and schools for the deaf in Ontario and Alberta for over 30 years, and now coordinates, and teaches in, the teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing education program at York. Her areas of research are in educational audiology, deaf and hard of hearing education, auditory learning in the classroom and accommodations for students with hearing loss at the post-secondary level. She writes a monthly column for Canadian Audiologist, the journal of the Canadian Academy of Audiology, entitled Audiology in the Classroom.

 

Workshop 4: What About Wi-Fi for Hearing Assistance in Performing Arts Centers? Is it as easy as they say?
Presented By: Tony W. Strong
Tchaikovsky Room

Come to this session to get the who, what, where and how on Wi-Fi assistive listening systems. Find out how these systems work and the pros and cons of this state-of-the-art technology. New tends for “Bring Your Own Device” solutions might be a better option. Why or Why not? Is there an APP for that? We will discuss the Pros and cons of the newer Wi-Fi and cell phone-based technologies where real time audio can stream to phones and tablets. What about those Hearing Loops? Why are venues spending the extra money on installed Loop Systems? Analyze the difference between Induction loop and other technologies for Assisted Listening.

Tony W. Strong
Tony StrongTony W. Strong is the National Sales Manager for Williams AV, a global designer and manufacturer of wireless communication technology serving personal and professional video and listening needs worldwide since 1976. Tony is a hands-on presenter who has worked in the Pro AV industry for many years as an integrator, sound engineer and sales management professional. He offers extensive experience speaking about the benefits of differing technologies for hearing assistance and simultaneous interpretation in a multitude of applications.